My Blog

Posts for: September, 2018

By Duensing Family Dentistry
September 22, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: sensitive teeth  
DontPutOffGettingTreatmentforYourSensitiveTeeth

While out with friends one evening, you take a bite of ice cream. Suddenly, pain shoots through your teeth. It only lasts a second, but it's enough to ruin your good time.

This could be tooth sensitivity, a painful reaction to hot or cold foods. It often occurs when the enamel in prolonged contact with acid has eroded. Acid is a waste product of bacteria found in plaque, a thin film of food particles that builds up on tooth surfaces due to inadequate brushing and flossing. Enamel normally mutes temperature or pressure sensation to the underlying dentin layer and nerves. Loss of enamel exposes the dentin and nerves to the full brunt of these sensations.

Sensitivity can also happen if your gums have shrunk back (receded) and exposed dentin below the enamel. Although over-aggressive brushing can often cause it, gum recession also happens because of periodontal (gum) disease, a bacterial infection also arising from plaque.

The best way to avoid tooth sensitivity is to prevent enamel erosion or gum recession in the first place. Removing accumulated plaque through daily brushing and flossing is perhaps the most essential part of prevention, along with a nutritious diet low in sugar and regular dental cleanings and checkups.

It's also important to treat any dental disease that does occur despite your best hygiene efforts. Gum disease requires aggressive plaque removal, especially around the roots. While receded gum tissues often rebound after treatment, you may need gum grafting surgery to restore lost tissues if the gums have receded more deeply. For enamel erosion and any resulting decay you may need a filling, root canal treatment or a crown, depending on the depth and volume of structural damage.

While you're being treated you can also gain some relief from ongoing sensitivity by using a toothpaste with potassium nitrate or similar products designed to desensitize the dentin. Fluoride, a known enamel strengthener, has also been shown to reduce sensitivity. We can apply topical fluoride directly to tooth surfaces in the form of gels or varnishes.

Don't suffer through bouts of tooth sensitivity any more than you must. Visit us for a full exam and begin treatment to relieve you of the pain and stress.

If you would like more information on the causes and treatment of tooth sensitivity, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Treatment of Tooth Sensitivity.”


By Duensing Family Dentistry
September 12, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: ibuprofen   pain management  
NSAIDsforPainManagementisSafe-ifUsedProperly

Millions of Americans regularly use ibuprofen to manage minor pain and swelling. As with other fields in healthcare, the drug is a mainstay in dentistry especially for post-procedural discomfort. But ibuprofen and similar drugs also have side effects that can lead to serious health problems. So, should you be concerned about its safety?

For most people, ibuprofen is safe and effective — but only if used properly. Like aspirin, ibuprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that reduces pain and inflammation by blocking the effect of substances called prostaglandins, released by injured or damaged tissues. NSAIDs differ in mechanism from pain relievers like steroids or narcotics and don’t have the same side effects, especially the addictive qualities and impaired consciousness potential of narcotics like morphine or codeine. While these more potent drugs are usually reserved for serious injuries or illnesses, NSAIDs like ibuprofen are ideal for mild to moderate pain following routine dental work.

The biggest concern for the use of an NSAID is its tendency to thin the blood, especially if used continuously over several weeks; this can make bleeding control more difficult after an injury. Prolonged overuse has also been linked to erosion of the stomach lining leading to ulcers or bleeding, kidney failure, early miscarriage and repeat heart attacks for patients with cardiovascular disease.

With this in mind, we recommend that adults take no more than 2,400 milligrams of ibuprofen during one twenty-four hour period for short-term pain relief unless otherwise recommended by a doctor. Research has shown that a single 400-milligram dose of ibuprofen is safe and effective for relieving even severe post-operative pain for about five hours in most people. On the other hand, we don’t recommend a NSAID during pregnancy or for people with a history of intestinal bleeding or heart attacks.

Taking into account your medical history and the procedure you’ll be undergoing, we will recommend the best pain management medication for your situation. In most cases, ibuprofen will be an effective means to reduce your discomfort level and, taken properly, will not pose a danger to your overall health.

If you would like more information on dental pain management, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Treating Pain with Ibuprofen.”


By Duensing Family Dentistry
September 02, 2018
Category: Oral Health
5WarningSignsYouMayHaveGumDisease

Periodontal (gum) disease, a bacterial infection caused by plaque, is one of the most prevalent and destructive dental conditions. Left untreated it can eventually lead to tooth and bone loss.

Although people are often unaware they have gum disease, there are a few warning signs to look for. Here are five gum disease signs that should prompt a dental visit.

Gum Swelling and Redness. Like all infections, gum disease triggers an immune system response that releases antibodies into the gums to attack the bacteria. The ensuing battle results in inflammation (swelling) and a darker redness to the gum tissues that don’t lessen with time.

Gum Bleeding. It isn’t normal for healthy gum tissue, which are quite resilient, to bleed. In a few cases, bleeding may indicate over-aggressive brushing, but more likely it means the tissues have weakened to such an extent by infection they bleed easily.

Tooth Sensitivity. If you notice a shot of pain when you eat or drink something hot or cold or when you bite down, this could mean infected gums have “drawn back” (receded) from the teeth. Gum recession exposes the tooth roots, which are more sensitive to temperature and pressure changes in the mouth.

An Abscess. As weakened gum tissues detach from the tooth, the normally thin gap between them and the tooth deepens to form a void known as a periodontal pocket. This often results in an abscess where pus collects in the pocket and causes it to appear more swollen and red than nearby tissues. An abscess needs immediate attention as bone loss is greatly accelerated compared to normal gum disease.

Tooth Looseness or Movement. As diseased gum tissue causes loss of gum and bone attachment, the affected teeth will start to feel loose or even move to a different position. This is a late and alarming sign of gum disease — without immediate intervention, you’re in danger of losing the tooth.

If you encounter any of these signs, contact us for an examination as soon as possible. The sooner we can diagnose gum disease and begin treatment, the less damage it will cause — and the better your odds of regaining healthy teeth and gums.

If you would like more information on gum disease, please contact us to schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Warning Signs of Periodontal (Gum) Disease.”